November 16, 2012
"It felt refreshing. I was able to spend an entire day reading with a candle next to me instead of anxiously checking my emails and wondering who was liking my facebook status. I was able to reflect and think of how little the rest of the world has, and how lucky I was to be “unfortunate” in the pitch black dark in my Soho loft."

— Amanda Slavin via Huffington Post

(Source: The Huffington Post)

November 5, 2012
"Power is key and yet it’s sucks to be cold at night in the house, but the biggest thing I miss is Internet access. Constant and immediate connection to the web. […] I never realized how much time I spend on the web a day."

— Reddit User sodoubleoggood, Branchburg NJ

November 5, 2012
"I honestly felt liberated. So many people forget that there was life before power and internet. Climbing up 6 flights of stairs a couple times a day got a little old, especially with a bicycle but that’s what I get for living on the 6th floor. If given the option I would do it again."

— Reddit User faustkenny, Gramercy

November 5, 2012
"What sucks is I am in the middle of a job search, and it had to be put on hold right now because I need an actual computer; mobile doesn’t cut it. I lost a whole week. In the end, I don’t really care about sports scores or Reddit, those are just luxuries. It’s nigh impossible to peruse job listings without proper internet."

— Reddit User rwbombc, Hoboken

November 5, 2012
"Given the sense of desperation and confusion, lacking Internet was tough. There was no way to get information, except on your phone. Once your battery died, or your cell service went down, you were screwed. Try figuring out how to use the modified bus system, or where to get gas when you cant access the Internet, and a wrong move ends up costing you half a day of waiting in line."

— Reddit User deadmansstare

November 4, 2012
"I felt isolated. When making plans with people I had to really stick to them."

— Michael Youhana, Student, East Village NYC

November 4, 2012
"We needed to go to a restaurant in midtown to get Internet and cell service, but it was hard to find one without access to Internet or cell service… Once we got there, we all sat in silence for 45 minutes on our phones."

— Priya Vij, Journalism student, East Village NYC

November 4, 2012
"We left the East Village and went to Harlem to get power, running water and Internet. When we got there we vegged out on the Internet. We were exhausted and updating our friends and family was stressful but necessary."

— Anna Sompolski, Student, East Village NYC

November 4, 2012
“It was strange working in the Far Rockaways where there was no cellphone signal or access to internet at all; it was like being in a really remote part of Haiti. Humbling juxtaposition. The difference is that in Haiti someone would have probably found a way to jerry rig something to get partial service going.”—Tara Yip-Bannicq, full time relief worker in Haiti, Brooklyn NYC

It was strange working in the Far Rockaways where there was no cellphone signal or access to internet at all; it was like being in a really remote part of Haiti. Humbling juxtaposition. The difference is that in Haiti someone would have probably found a way to jerry rig something to get partial service going.—Tara Yip-Bannicq, full time relief worker in Haiti, Brooklyn NYC

November 4, 2012
"Communication is the life-blood of any emergency situation. Without it, efforts are duplicated, resources are wasted, and lives are put in jeopardy. At best, you lose efficiency; at worst, you lose men."

— Jake Wood, founder of Team Rubicon, Providing relief efforts across the East Coast

(Source: teamrubiconusa.org)

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